Natalia Andrea Reyes Rodríguez

 nareyes@udca.edu.co

GRUPOS DE INVESTIGACIÓN: CIENCIA ANIMAL

LÍNEAS DE INVESTIGACIÓN:   Salud Animal – Medicina y cirugía de pequeños animales

FACULTAD:  Ciencias Agropecuarias

CATEGORÍA COLCIENCIAS:    

NIVEL DE FORMACIÓN: Maestría/Magister

Médico veterinario, MSC en salud animal, con énfasis en medicina interna y cirugía de pequeños animales

PRODUCTOS DESTACADOS

Skull pathology in 10 cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome
Fecha de publicación: 01/08/2019

Case series summary: The aim of this case series is to describe the clinical and radiological features of mandibular and maxillary abnormalities in cats diagnosed with patellar fractures and dental anomalies, a condition that we have named ‘patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome’ (PADS), also known previously as ‘knees and teeth syndrome’. Where available, clinical records, skull and/or intraoral dental radiographs, head CT images, microbiology and histopathology reports were collected, and follow-up was obtained. Ten cats with mandibular or maxillary abnormalities were identified. Common clinical features included multiple persistent deciduous teeth, gingivitis and swellings of the jaw. Skull radiographs were available for 7/10 cats and head CT images were available for one cat. Findings included marked bony and periosteal proliferation, hypodontia, root resorption, root malformation and unerupted permanent teeth. Where available, microbiology and histopathology results were consistent with osteomyelitis. Relevance and novel information: Mandibular and maxillary abnormalities are an additional unreported clinical feature of the rare condition that we have termed PADS. Radiologically, these lesions can have an aggressive appearance, which can mimic neoplasia. Medical management with antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy improves clinical signs in the short term; however, surgical extraction of persistent deciduous and unerupted permanent teeth, and debridement of proliferative and necrotic bone appear to be necessary for an improved outcome. Additional information on long-term outcome is required. © The Author(s) 2018.


Más información

Incidence and types of preceding and subsequent fractures in cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome
Fecha de publicación: 01/08/2019

Objectives: The aim of this study was to document the incidence of preceding and subsequent fractures to the patellar fractures in cats with patellar fractures and dental anomaly syndrome. Methods: Records of cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome were retrieved from the combined databases at the University of Bristol, UK, and Exclusively Cats Veterinary Hospital, USA. A request was made to complete a questionnaire to obtain long-term follow-up of these cats with respect to their current status and fractures to other bones; radiographs and histories were requested and were reviewed for treatment of ongoing fractures and outcome. Results: Of the 191 cases reported with this syndrome, 92 cats (48.2%) had dental anomalies and 78 (40.8%) had fractures to other bones; 21 cats sustained the fractures preceding the patellar fractures and 57 subsequently. In total, there were 175 fractures: acetabulum (25%), tibia (22%), ischium (15.4%), humeral condyle (13.7%), calcaneus (5.1%), ilium (5.1%), pubis (3.4%) and other bones (10.2%). The majority of these fractures were characteristic of insufficiency (stress) fractures with a very similar configuration in each bone. Conclusions and relevance: A high proportion of cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome will have preceding or subsequent fractures to their patellar fractures. In this study, >10% of cats suffered characteristic fractures preceding the patellar fractures. The presence of these fractures should alert the veterinarian to the possibility that the cat is affected by patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome. © The Author(s) 2018.


Más información